3 Traits Of Wine That Age Well

By Katherine Turner. We have often heard people appreciating drinking an aged wine as vintage bottles are preferred over newer ones. Worldwide, old wines are sold for extraordinary prices. There is an element of fascination associated with it. It is also true that an aged wine has interesting flavors and textures that can’t be experienced with a young wine. A wine ages when it is stored in a dark, cool place for several years, allowing it to improve as it sits in its bottle. There are various factors which determine the aging of wine. Apart from a few traits of wine itself, the storage method, bottle, the variety of the grape, region of the vineyard, winemaking style and the cork also contribute in this process. The wine quality also depends on the conditions that the bottle of the wine is kept in. Interestingly, 99% of wines are meant to be consumed within 5 years of its manufacture. This indicates that most of the wines are consumed young worldwide. The complexity of wines has interested man for years. Wine experts rely on their past experiences to understand what ages a wine well. Factors which determine the aging of wine: 1) Tannin They are the textural component in wine which makes it dry. Tannins are responsible for the astringency and the bitterness of red wine, which often confuses wine lovers who are always ready to toast their glasses. Tannins in wine come from stems, seeds, skins of grapes. The extraction largely depends on the winemaking process that is being followed. Few tannins also come from barrels used to age wine, especially new ones. The chemical...

Pairing Wine and Chocolate

This Pairing Wine and Chocolate post is original from ProFlowers. Pairing wine and chocolate can be a contentious point for wine connoisseurs. The rich, bold tastes of both makes marrying them difficult. In order to make sure you can highlight accents of the wine as well as the chocolate, check out the shareable guide below. We also researched a few basic rules that will help simplify the complicated business of pairing tannins with tastes. Chocolate has an array of strong flavors including sweet, bitter, fruity and even acidic. These tastes do not pair well with a standard dry table wine. Regardless of how lovely a bottle of wine it is, after a bite of a rich chocolate bar it won’t have any flavor. Try a sweet dessert wine instead! The comparable richness will enhance the taste of both. Basic wine and chocolate pairing rules: The wine should be as sweet as the chocolate. Begin pairing by color. The darker the chocolate, the darker the wine. When possible, opt for a high quality chocolate bar. Consider texture as well as...

Pairing Italian Food: Pinot, Pasta and Parties – The cookbook to match your wine party

As some of you know, I’m from Barcelona. I still get goose pumps every time I listen Joan Manel Serrat’s song  ‘Mediterraneo’ which is an ode to the landscape and lifestyle around the Mediterranean Sea. So, when Pinot, Pasta, and Parties Italian cookbook arrived to my hands I opened it with a truly critical sense. I say to my friends that Catalan food resembles Italian food except for the fact that we don’t do pasta and our pizzas don’t have cheese (and by the way, this makes the conversation even more confusing). So, when I was reading the book, I checked the ingredients and cooking techniques to see if it has a real Mediterranean heritage… Or not. Conclusion: it does. Olive oil, garlic, fresh herbs and vegetables, tomato-based sauces and easy going desserts. This makes me think of my home and dying to try these meals! I imagine myself at a tiny table, eyes semi-closed to protect them from the bright sun over the Sea. The “Mare Nostrum” Sea. Dee Dee and Paul Sorvino wrote a book that transports you from their love story to the expertise of many years in the kitchen cooking for family and friends. An authentic Italian Cookbook! The book has menus with a full Italian set: aperitivo, antipasto, primi, secondi, contorni, insalta and dolce. And a bonus: Dee Dee offers a special cocktail in every chapter!. The good: you have plenty of recipes to match any occasion. From easy to more time consuming. From munchies with friends to dinner-to-impress your mother-in-law. The bad: though it has a great chapter describing the most famous Italian grape varieties, I missed...

Wine Regions

This post is a guide to the upcoming posts about wine regions. I’m working in the best way to display them, so, if when reading you find a better choice to present this idea, please, let me know. This is a world map showing the main wine producing areas: Wine regions fall under these 2 denominations: Old World, referring to wines produced in Europe New World, referring to wines produced outside Europe To learn more about the these regions, every click will bring you a step deeper in the hierarchic classification. As I produce them, I’ll add them to the list. To ease the search, in the box below you have them in alphabetical order following these tabs: By Country  1.FRANCE: ALSACE  –  2.USA: LODI  By Region 1.Alsace: ALSACE  –  2.California: LODI  By Appellation 1.ALSACE (France)  –  2.LODI, Central Valley, California...

Wine News

PR Newswire contacted me for adding a page in this blog with wine news… And I thought it sounded good!. So… Introducing… “Wines News* at What VINO” Go to Wine News *You can find them in whatvino.com/wine-news or at the end of the right side bar in every page....

Alsace Wine Region (France)

Alsace wine region is easy  for beginners. The wines are 90% white wines and they serve well for learning about the varieties. The wines reflect the pure flavor and expression of the fruit character of the variety (blendings are unusual in Alsace). Appellations and labelling are simple. From dry to sweet wines and with a good quality/price ratio. Post index: Where in the world is Alsace? Grapes of Alsatian wines Understanding Appellations and Labelling of Alsatian wines Styles of Alsatian wines Aging Alsatian wines 1. Where in the world is Alsace? Alsace is nowadays a region in France, but this region is a strategic place disputed between France and Germany for centuries, so the culture, the landscape, the culinary traditions even the grapes they use for wine, are a mix of France and Germany. If you have the opportunity, it’s worth visiting for its fairy tale scenery, let alone its wines. Alsatian wines are aromatic, full-bodied and high in alcohol because of the sunny and dry but cool climate. The sun ripens the fruit, providing a good sugar level that lends to high alcohol wines. Also, the wines can be concentrated and aromatic, as the rainfall is low. A trick to pick a better wine is to discover where the vineyard is: if in a slope facing east or south east, awesome. This is known as Upper Rhine (Haut Rhine). That is because with a cool climate, placing the vineyard in a slope oriented towards the sun is critical to achieve a good ripeness level. The vineyards that lie in the plains do not received as much sun, so, they are used to...